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Eurest | Consistency |  25 July 2017

dessert

It may taste peculiar, it may have a satisfying rip-and-stick function or it may need a bit of sticky tape to hold it down, but when you post a letter you seal the envelope — right?

Actually no, a surprising number of people refuse to seal their envelopes leading to a significant chunk of mail going astray. This strange habit may stem from when it was cheaper to send unsealed envelopes, when what could and couldn’t be sent were observed by ‘checkers’; sealed envelopes were surcharged.

But this way of charging for postage was abolished in 1969 and, if this old habit was the reason unsealed mail continues, surely as new mail users came along who didn’t remember those days the practice would die out?

New research has delved into this strange world to find out why people don’t lick and stick, revealing a range of bizarre justifications. Some people don’t seal to show there’s nothing of value in their letter while another group thinks they’re taking advantage of a (non-existent) loop hole whereby unsealed second class post goes first class. Others say they want to avoid any calories included in the adhesive.

Whatever the reason, failing to seal your envelope massively magnifies the chances that something will go wrong with your delivery. Quirky inconsistency puts a successful result in jeopardy. 

At Eurest, we believe in consistency as a way of guaranteeing right-each-time delivery. 

We know that consistency in every aspect of your meal experience is crucial to your enjoyment and we also don’t leave delivering our services every day to a consistently high standard to chance. We’ve crafted every aspect of our operational excellence strategy to make sure you’re satisfied; we put processes in place to make sure every metaphorical envelope is sealed. 

BBC News Magazine (2013) ‘Why do some people refuse to seal envelopes?’ BBC News Magazine 8 January 2014 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-25549394 (Accessed 13 January 2014). 

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