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Getting to know you?

Eurest | Understanding you |  28 May 2013

Understanding you

FRESH AND NEW IS EXCITING, AND THE DISCOVERIES OF NEW TRIBES IN THE LAST FEW YEARS HAS REALLY CAUGHT OUR COLLECTIVE IMAGINATION — THE SO-CALLED 'UNCONTACTED' TRIBES DEEP IN THE AMAZONIAN RAINFOREST IN BRAZIL, PERU AND OTHER SOUTH AMERICAN COUNTRIES WHO HAVE NEVER HAD CONTACT WITH THE SO-CALLED 'CIVILISED WORLD (NATIONAL GEOGRAPHICAL NEWSWATCH, 2012).  

One of the things that makes it extraordinary is that, apart from a few specialists in the field such as anthropologists, most people aren’t particularly interested in the tribes that have been discovered.

There seems to be something about revealing the existence of a people completely shielded from the view of others that we find utterly compelling. They don’t dress like us, they lead extraordinarily simple lives, and eat whatever they can trap, fish or hit with an arrow. They have never seen a car let alone an aeroplane and they survive without televisions, smartphones and laptops. It’s like turning back time.

While there’s nothing wrong with showing an interest in the lives of our fellow human beings, some of the scrutiny we foist upon these people seems uncomfortably like looking at animals in a zoo. 

We can assume that they have stayed undiscovered for all these centuries because they like it that way. The clue is in the word ‘uncontacted’. These people live deep in the rainforest and their way of life means they can be self sufficient; or at least until they are discovered.

The other way they can be discovered is via the attention of the so called ‘eco tourists’ who flock to the Amazon by the busload to get an eyeful of the communities in their natural environment. But the fact that these people have never had contact with outsiders makes them extremely vulnerable to disease and exploitation — their very existence can be ruined by such contact.

Such a lack of basic human understanding and empathy, leading to such callous and careless behaviour, goes against the grain with many of us. Yet many human safari tourists feel they are doing nothing wrong until it’s pointed out to them.

Sensitivity and empathy are key to any relationship — and that includes how we interact with our customers. Something that delights one customer might not necessarily be right for someone else. What’s a close and supportive working relationship for one company might be too intrusive for another. We treat all of our customers as individuals, and we never, ever assume we know what they want. It’s part of our Understanding You credentials. We ask, we listen and we make sure whatever we do is exactly right for you.

Otherwise we’d quickly find ourselves out in the wilderness.

National Geographic (2011), Uncontacted Tribe Discovered in Brazilian Amazon [online]
http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2011/06/22/uncontacted-tribe-discovered-in-brazilian-amazon/ (Accessed 25 February 2013.)

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